jtotheizzoe

thesharkspirit asked:

I'm not arguing for or against global warming, but how can we accurately predict global warming over millions of years when the weatherman can barely predict what will happen tomorrow? There are photos of ice increasing in the Arctic from the start of November 2013 and yet people say the earth is heating up. I'm sort of conflicted on the issue and would like to know your opinion on it.

jtotheizzoe answered:

My friend, what you need to realize is that my opinion doesn’t matter. Nor does your opinion, or anyone else’s opinion. This isn’t about opinions.

This is about science. We can predict with confidence how the climate will change in the next several years because scientists have spent decades studying the climate of the past, from eons-old atmosphere trapped in ancient ice cores to fossilized coral growth rings in a changing ocean to advanced computer modeling that can take into account everything from the angle of the dangle of the sun to the cooling effect of volcanos and dino-killing meteorites.

We have DATA. Data that strongly—and strongly here really doesn’t do justice to how sure we are—suggests that human beings are accelerating climate change to ludicrous speed*.

Like Neil deGrasse Tyson says: “Science is true whether or not you believe in it.” Accepting that is a wonderful thing. The world is full of lies, and science can keep you from getting hustled.

Your weatherman is wrong because weather doesn’t equal climate. Weather is the lucky guy who comes home from Vegas with a stack of cash. Climate is the casino, and given enough time, no matter how many suckers may hit the jackpot, the house always wins.

*Spaceballs reference, aw yiss

explore-blog
  1. The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger by Marc Levinson
  2. The Most Powerful Idea in the World: A Story of Steam, Industry, and Invention by William Rosen
  3. Harvesting the Biosphere: What We Have Taken from Nature by Vaclav Smil
  4. The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? by Jared Diamond
  5. Poor Numbers: How We Are Misled by African Development Statistics and What to Do about It by Morten Jerven
  6. Why Does College Cost So Much? by Robert B. Archibald and David H. Feldman
  7. The Bet: Paul Ehrlich, Julian Simon, and Our Gamble over Earth’s Future by Paul Sabin
Bill Gates's 7 favorite books of 2013 (via explore-blog)
jayparkinsonmd

jayparkinsonmd:

A team of UC Davis researchers found that people who are the most satisfied with their doctors are more likely to be hospitalized, accumulate more health-care and drug expenditures, and have higher death rates than patients who are less satisfied with their care.

Published today in the Archives of Internal Medicine, the national study is believed to be the first to suggest that an overemphasis on patient satisfaction could have unanticipated adverse effects.

Absolutely fascinating. This makes a ton of sense to me. This finding is absolutely associated with the fact that over 100,000 people die every year due to contact with the American healthcare industry. People often associate intensity/completeness with quality.

This is one of the major reasons why Sherpaa exists. We protect folks from what can be a dangerous healthcare industry and keep them away from it.

jtotheizzoe
jtotheizzoe:

Seasons Come and Seasons Glow
We’ve all eaten more than we can hold, especially this time of year. Did you know plants can get full, too?
The elaborate process of converting sunlight into usable energy (the so-called “light reactions”) is essentially a big chain where one protein hands off electrons to the next in order to break apart water and build up a bunch of hydrogen ions that can be used to power the ATP factory:

It’s a lot like carrying buckets of water upriver in order to power the water wheel at the old mill. The thing is any a given chloroplast can only hold and process so much sun energy at once. In order to prevent damage to the leaf factory, it gets rid of the excess, either via heat or by giving off light.
That’s right, plants can glow! Or more accurately, chlorophyll can fluoresce. And they do it just about any time they are undergoing photosynthesis, it’s just that we can’t see it. But NASA can. Their Earth-observing satellites can detect this excess plant energy and use it to check how active and healthy our planet’s vegetation is.
The above visualization from NASA shows four years worth of plant fluorescence, averaged into one complete seasonal cycle. Winter turns to spring, spring to summer, and autumn leaves fall, played out in waves of glowing pink.
Previously: The world viewed through Kodak’s Aerochrome film … pink plants everywhere!

jtotheizzoe:

Seasons Come and Seasons Glow

We’ve all eaten more than we can hold, especially this time of year. Did you know plants can get full, too?

The elaborate process of converting sunlight into usable energy (the so-called “light reactions”) is essentially a big chain where one protein hands off electrons to the next in order to break apart water and build up a bunch of hydrogen ions that can be used to power the ATP factory:

It’s a lot like carrying buckets of water upriver in order to power the water wheel at the old mill. The thing is any a given chloroplast can only hold and process so much sun energy at once. In order to prevent damage to the leaf factory, it gets rid of the excess, either via heat or by giving off light.

That’s right, plants can glow! Or more accurately, chlorophyll can fluoresce. And they do it just about any time they are undergoing photosynthesis, it’s just that we can’t see it. But NASA can. Their Earth-observing satellites can detect this excess plant energy and use it to check how active and healthy our planet’s vegetation is.

The above visualization from NASA shows four years worth of plant fluorescence, averaged into one complete seasonal cycle. Winter turns to spring, spring to summer, and autumn leaves fall, played out in waves of glowing pink.

Previously: The world viewed through Kodak’s Aerochrome film … pink plants everywhere!

itsfullofstars

itsfullofstars:

Congressional Space Medal of Honor

Astronaut Neil Armstrong received the first Congressional Space Medal of Honor from President Jimmy Carter, assisted by Captain Robert Peterson. Armstrong, one of six astronauts to be presented the medal during ceremonies held in the Vehicle Assembly Building, was awarded for his performance during the Gemini 8 mission and the Apollo 11 mission when he became the first human to set foot upon the moon.